Captured: Life in South African Townships

A MOTHER AND DAUGHTER FEATURED IN ANNE REARICK’S PHOTOGRAPHY BOOK  TOWNSHIP . CREDIT: ANNE REARICK

A MOTHER AND DAUGHTER FEATURED IN ANNE REARICK’S PHOTOGRAPHY BOOK TOWNSHIP. CREDIT: ANNE REARICK

 
 

DOCUMENTARY PHOTOGRAPHER ANNE REARICK CAPTURED INTIMATE MOMENTS IN SOUTH AFRICAN TOWNSHIPS.

For Anne Rearick, it’s crucial that her artwork always takes a human approach. That’s what makes the Idaho-born photographer’s documentation of townships so extraordinary: intimate shots and close-up portraiture in hospitals and living rooms, churches and community gatherings.

“It takes time to build trusting relationships with people,” she explains. “I try not to be in a hurry. I visited the same families over and over again.”

 
TWO CHILDREN IN  TOWNSHIP.  CREDIT: ANNE REARICK

TWO CHILDREN IN TOWNSHIP. CREDIT: ANNE REARICK

 
 

For her photo book Township, Anne Rearick made dozens of trips to predominantly black townships such as Langa, Khayelitsha, Philippi and Gugulethu on the outskirts of Cape Town. The monograph of 100 black-and-white images was published in 2016.

 
 
A MINISTER PICTURED IN THE BOOK  TOWNSHIP.  CREDIT: ANNE REARICK

A MINISTER PICTURED IN THE BOOK TOWNSHIP. CREDIT: ANNE REARICK

 
 

“Townships in South Africa are unique because they are physical manifestations of the long-term effects of white supremacy, violence and oppression,” she says. “Looking through my lens, I see love, faith, strength of spirit and beauty existing side by side with the challenges and urgency of daily life.”

The photographer finds vibrant life in shantytowns that once enforced segregation during apartheid. Although poverty and crime are still forces to be reckoned with, Rearick’s subjects can be seen holding their heads up against all odds. “My pictures are a testament to the enduring spirit of those South Africans who face endemic violence, extreme economic hardship, and racism that has not abated, while still maintaining dignity, hope and courage.”

See more of Township below and on Anne Rearick’s website.

 
 
 
 
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